No Time For Flu

15 09 2016

We’re launching our national educational campaign “No Time For Flu.” Hooray!

The campaign sounds the alarm about the dangers of flu, and alerts the public to the need for everyone six months of age and older to be vaccinated against influenza to prevent transmission of the disease.

NoTimeForFlu

Flu sweeps around the world each year, and is a contagious and potentially deadly viral infection that can be dangerous for anyone—healthy young adults, pregnant women, babies, and seniors.

Commonly known as flu, influenza is marked by some or even all of these symptoms:

  • Fever or feeling feverish/chills (not everyone experiences fever)
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headaches
  • Fatigue (tiredness)
  • Vomiting and diarrhea (more common in kids than adults)

“Some people infected with flu feel achy and tired, or they might have a sore throat, cough, or fever. They might even have a runny or stuffy nose. Many flu symptoms are similar to cold symptoms, which is why people sometimes mix them up and think it’s no big deal, just a cold,” said Trish Parnell, director of PKIDs.

Flu symptoms can last for days and are usually gone by the end of two weeks.

Flu viruses are transmitted in various ways—even with a kiss. Or, an infected person can cough, sneeze, or talk and spray tiny infected droplets into the air. Those droplets are then breathed in through the nose or the mouth of anyone nearby.

An infected person can also cough, sneeze, or talk and spray tiny droplets into the air, which then plop onto tables, or doorknobs, or other surfaces. Individuals later touch those surfaces and get the droplets on their hands. When those same hands touch the nose, mouth, or eyes, the droplets are transferred from the surface to the body, and transmit the virus.

An infected person can transmit the flu virus even before he or she starts to feel ill.

The CDC states that every year in the United States, on average:

  • 5% to 20% of the population gets the flu;
  • more than 200,000 people are hospitalized from flu complications, and;
  • about 36,000 people die from flu.

Flu doesn’t treat everyone the same. It can lead to pneumonia or perhaps, in children, sinus or ear infections. It can make an existing medical condition such as asthma much worse, and one can even die from flu

The fact that flu can take perfectly healthy individuals and kill them in a matter of days is the most confounding aspect of infection.

PKIDs’ “No Time For Flu” campaign reaches out through social media platforms and a website, www.pkids.org/flu, to educate the public on flu and how to prevent infection.

Through the use of videos, posters, and fresh informative materials, the public’s questions about flu are answered with clarity, and the need to use immunization and clean hands as strong tools to prevent infection is made clear.

“It’s so easy to catch the flu, and so easy to prevent it. Plan ahead, roll up your sleeve, and protect yourself and your loved ones,” said Ari Brown, MD, pediatrician and author of Baby 411 book series.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends that everyone 6 months and older get an annual flu vaccination. There are rare exceptions, and an individual’s healthcare provider will be the person to address those issues.

NOTE: For the 2016-2017 flu season, CDC recommends that only the injectable flu vaccines be used, and not the nasal spray flu vaccine. Ongoing studies are determining the effectiveness of the nasal spray vaccine.

Because the flu strains change each year, an annual vaccination which matches the existing strains is required.

Please visit our site and use the images and other materials to encourage your community to immunize against flu.





Clean Those Hands!

11 08 2016

My older daughter started preschool when she was three.

That autumn, our lives changed — our healthy little family became a sick, exhausted mess.

Every three to four weeks for the next several years, at least one of us would be felled by some illness.

I remember commenting on it to the preschool director. She laughed and explained that it happened to every teacher and family new to preschool or daycare.

A perfectly healthy family or individual would, soon after their first exposure to school, dissolve into a puddle of sickly goo and stay that way for years.

It was due to the teeming mass of sneezing, coughing, nose-picking, walking petri dishes we called children, who cheerfully plastered germs on each other and on every surface in the building.

preschool

We were all immunized against the diseases for which there were vaccines. But, that didn’t account for those germs running free with nothing to stop them but a pair of clean hands.

We had to up our hand cleaning game, big time.

And here’s the thing about clean hands — one could almost say the conundrum of public health — when we use soap and water on our hands, we wash off most of the germs, but as soon as our clean hands touch an unsterilized surface (a.k.a. pretty much anything or anyone in the world outside of instruments in an operating room), germs hop right back on our hands.

The same is true with hand sanitizer. As soon as it’s dry and our hands touch a germy surface, we’re loaded for bear, as my grandma used to say.

One could ask, why bother to clean our hands?

It’s a fair question. The answer is simple — by cleaning our hands numerous times a day, we continually get rid of the hitchhiker germs.

If we add cleanliness to the habit of keeping our hands away from our eyes, nose, and mouth, then we have a good shot at avoiding lots and lots of infections.

Cleaning our hands frequently throughout the day is not a guarantee of good health, but not cleaning them is a sure way to spend a lot of time feeling lousy.

 

 

by Trish Parnell

Image courtesy Pixabay





Zika Virus In The US

29 07 2016

We are all familiar with the word “Zika” because of the infections in Brazil.

The Florida Health Department and state officials have announced that they have identified four cases of Zika virus infection that were most likely transmitted locally. These cases are in Wynwood, an area just north of Miami

This is probably the first time that mosquito-borne transmission of Zika virus has happened in the continental US.mosquito

The CDC and Florida are saying “likely” and “probably” because, although they cannot yet prove these individuals were bitten by infected mosquitoes, there seems to be no other method of transmission in these cases, and the mosquito that carries the virus does live in the area.

However, this does not mean that the Zika virus will become widespread in the US.

The Zika virus is transmitted a few ways. The most common way for people to get the Zika virus is to be bitten by an infected Aedes species mosquito (Ae. aegypti and Ae. Albopictus).

This mosquito doesn’t like the climate in all parts of the US. Much of the northern area will not be at risk from this mode of transmission.

Also, this mosquito never travels more than 150 meters its entire life. That’s less than 1/10th of a mile. It usually travels far less than that distance.

The West Nile virus, on the other hand, was able to pretty much cover the US because the virus can be transmitted from an infected mosquito to a bird, which then flies off quite a distance before landing and getting bitten by a different mosquito, which then becomes infected. That mosquito, in turn, bites another bird. This cycle hopscotches its way across the US, spreading disease from bird to mosquito to bird to mosquito.

The mosquitoes also infect humans and other mammals with West Nile virus.

The mosquitoes that carry the Zika virus don’t work that way. They prefer to only bite humans.

Another reason the Zika virus will probably not explode across the US is because where the mosquito lives, people use screens across their windows and doorways, and they use air conditioning. It’s more difficult for the mosquito to get into the houses.

There are other ways for the Zika virus to be transmitted.

An infected pregnant woman can pass it to her fetus during pregnancy or around the time of birth.

An infected individual can pass the virus through sex with their partner. An infected person may or may not be symptomatic—they can still transmit the virus. It appears that four out of five infections are asymptomatic. One cannot assume that a person is virus-free just because they don’t seem to be sick.

An infected person may donate blood and the virus can then be passed through blood transfusions.

This virus is under a lot of scrutiny. New methods of transmission may be identified, but these are the primary methods at this time.

Now we have an idea of how it’s transmitted. What can we do about it?

Where pockets of infection have occurred, the state and local authorities have started aggressive mosquito control, including spraying and going door to door to alert residents to standing water. Mosquitoes love to lay eggs in standing water—making sure there is none helps to control the mosquito population.

We all need to prevent mosquito bites by using insect repellent containing DEET, wearing long sleeves and pants, and staying indoors unless covered and protected. This is particularly true for pregnant women, and for those living in areas where these mosquitoes are common.

For up-to-date info on Zika virus, visit http://www.cdc.gov/zika/





Flu And Pregnant You

21 07 2016

Pregnant women are harder hit by flu than women of the same age who are not pregnant. Their symptoms are usually more severe, there are more hospitalizations, and they’re at higher risk of premature delivery or even death.

Although the infection doesn’t travel from the woman to her fetus, if the mom-to-be is infected, her infection may indirectly hurt the fetus. pixabaybelly

A premature delivery may mean the baby is too small, or underdeveloped. It can even mean death for the baby. If fever is present, mom’s infection can also lead to an assortment of abnormalities in the baby.

Why is this? Well, we can’t say for sure.

Part of a pregnant woman’s immune system is changed, or weakened, during pregnancy. This happens so that the woman’s body won’t attack the fetus as a foreign invader.

This altered immune state may allow a flu virus to attack, causing harm to the pregnant woman.

It’s also possible that part of the immune response is actually boosted during pregnancy, causing an increase in inflammation in the lungs when a pregnant woman is infected with a flu virus.

This in turn may be causing the increase in death and illness found in some flu-infected pregnant women.

The fact that pregnant women’s organs are squished may also increase the risk of pneumonia or other problems. Also, because of the increased blood volume, a pregnant woman’s lungs are a little “wetter” and less capable of resisting a severe infection.

Could be, may, might — that’s not what we want to hear. We want definite reasons so that we can use definite means to prevent all of this.

Unfortunately, it’s just not that simple.

If you’re pregnant, be extra cautious when it comes to flu. Call your provider as soon as you have symptoms — early treatment makes a big difference.

Symptoms may include:
•    Fever
•    Chills
•    Fatigue
•    Cough or sore throat
•    Runny or stuffy nose
•    Muscle or body aches, headaches
•    Vomiting and diarrhea (although this is more common in children)

CDC recommends that if you are pregnant and have any of these signs, you should call 911 right away:
•    Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
•    Pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen
•    Sudden dizziness
•    Confusion
•    Severe or persistent vomiting
•    High fever that is not responding to Tylenol® (or store brand equivalent)
•    Decreased or no movement of your baby

CDC recommends that individuals six months of age and older be immunized each year against flu.

Immunization and clean hands are the two best tools to prevent infection. Check with your healthcare provider to see about staying up-to-date on your immunizations.





FluMist Doesn’t Make The Cut

27 06 2016

Bad news for people 2 through 49 years of age: it’s back to the needle for your annual flu vaccine.

CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) advises the CDC on immunization matters. At their last meeting, they advised against using the nasal spray flu vaccine during the 2016-2017 flu season.

The live, attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) is one we all love because it’s a simple spray up the nose. But, the data from the last three years say the spray vaccine’s effectiveness isn’t great. It just doesn’t seem to work that well.mom and daughter

When the nasal spray vaccine was first licensed, data showed it to be as effective as the vaccine given in a shot. Researchers have yet to figure out why the nasal spray isn’t currently protecting people from flu.

The ACIP made its recommendation, but the CDC’s director has to review and approve it before it becomes an official policy.

The final recommendation should be published in August or September 2016.





NFID Shares New Meningitis PSA

16 06 2016

NFID has a new PSA that we love.

There are lots of things in life that we may regret, but protecting ourselves against meningitis isn’t one of them. Get immunized against the various strains of meningitis — your life is precious.

Share the video, save a life!





Immunize Your Kids Against Meningitis B

8 06 2016

abby FB5 fall