Sports!

13 09 2006

Kids are back in school and signing up for sports. 

Some parents wonder about their infected children playing sports and possibly infecting others in the process.  Parents also wonder how concerned they should be about their children becoming infected from other players living with undiagnosed or undisclosed infections. 

We looked into this a while back and recently checked for updated information.  Here’s what we’ve discovered over the years:

Playing sports can be risky in many ways and part of that risk is the potential to become infected with all sorts of germs.

Parents of children living with diagnosed infectious diseases worry that they may be responsible for infecting another child.  They wonder if they should inform the coach or the school.  They worry that the adults in charge don’t really follow standard precautions, thereby increasing the risk of infections.  They want their kids to enjoy life and they want to do the right thing.

The American Academy of Pediatrics issued a policy statement on this dilemma in December, 1999: HIV and Other Blood-Borne Viral Pathogens in the Athletic Setting. In it, the Academy made clear, “Because of the low probability of transmission of their infection to other athletes, athletes infected with HIV, hepatitis B or hepatitis C should be allowed to participate in all sports.”

That participation, however, assumes all athletes and coaches will follow standard precautions to prevent and minimize exposure to blood-borne viruses.

There is no reason to exclude any student from sports if they’re infected with HIV, HBV or HCV.  Nor is there a reason to disclose the infection.  There are many people living with undiagnosed infections, so it is more prudent to ensure everyone is practicing standard precautions rather than simply excluding those with known infections and not properly protecting all athletes from undiagnosed infections.

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