Lessons Learned from Botswana’s AIDS Fight

16 07 2010

In the early to mid-’90s, life expectancy in Botswana was 65 years. Ten years later, it was below 40 years of age due to the impact of AIDS. The children of Botswana were also affected by the pandemic. To date, nearly 100,000 children have lost at least one parent to AIDS

Faced with such losses in a country with a population under 2 million, and determined to save its people, the government took action and the Botswana-Harvard AIDS Institute Partnership (BHP), was founded.

The Institute provides training and research, and acts as point of contact for the efforts to reduce HIV/AIDS in Botswana. In 2001, simultaneous to the opening of a state-of-the-art lab funded by the Institute, the government launched the Masa (or “new dawn”) treatment program, buying antiretrovirals and making them widely available at no cost to infected citizens. The research capabilities of the BHP, along with Botswana’s HIV/ AIDS education, prevention, and treatment efforts, are unparalleled and show impressive results.

Key factors in Botswana’s fight against HIV/AIDS include:

  • International and national funding and research partnerships (represented by the Botswana-Harvard AIDS Institute)
  • Coordination of education efforts at the national level, and targeted to specific populations including school-age children, pregnant and new mothers, and high risk adult populations
  • Education outreach including targeted mobile outreach (involving peer-to-peer education and counseling)
  • Focus on enrolling mothers in the program to prevent mother-child transmission of the disease.

Stemming the tide of mother-to-child transmission of HIV is crucial in halting the spread of disease. In Botswana, peer-to-peer enrollment in the government-sponsored prevention and treatment program slowly increased maternal participation from under 10% to just over 33%.

Both the Masa and the Botswana-Harvard Institute aren’t easily replicated in countries without a similarly high level of financial and governmental support, but the lessons learned can still be applied.

Although it’s unlikely that most developing countries have the resources to accomplish what wealthy Botswana has done, it is a bit of bright news in the otherwise depressing struggle that is HIV/AIDS in Africa.


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