Shot at Life

23 04 2012

Remember SARS? That virus popped up in China in 2003 and quickly coughed and sneezed its way to dozens of other countries. And the 2009 H1N1 virus made its introductory appearance in Mexico, when a pig infected a human. It then traveled the globe with a speed that shocked us.

The world is enormous, but nowadays it’s also quite small.

Long ago, when people were mostly nomadic in nature, diseases were not easily spread, at least not outside of one’s group or tribe.

Then we formed societies, lived closer together, traded wheat and pelts, and passed germs like nobody’s business. But it still took months and sometimes years for diseases to become widespread.

Today, with air travel, diseases can spread from country to country in a matter of days, and sometimes, within a few hours.

These diseases are not all new; many are vaccine-preventable. But, when the immunity in a community is low due to reluctance to vaccinate or lack of access to vaccines, these diseases which science has bested scatter anew, bringing illness and sometimes death.

The United Nations Foundation’s Shot@Life campaign targets Americans with the hope that we will be inspired to advocate for those with little or no access to vaccines.

That inspiration isn’t too hard to find, if you’re a mom or dad. Once you’re a parent, you acquire a faint and nagging voice that compels you to “parent” all kids, anyone’s kids, every kid.

There are numerous self-serving reasons to ensure everyone is vaccinated, and that’s OK. Who wants to get sick? There are some of us for whom this or that vaccine simply doesn’t work, or we can’t use a vaccine due to allergies or for other reasons. We’re unprotected and we depend on those around us to not get sick and, so, not infect us.

There are also simple, human reasons for wanting everyone vaccinated. There are boys and girls in need who should grow up laughing and being naughty sometimes, who should go to school and raise families. This one will clean toilets for 30 years and then retire to enjoy his grandchildren. That one will discover life on another planet. Another will be the teacher who changes the lives of hundreds of students, who in turn go on to do wondrous deeds.

It’s a really small world, when you think about it. Protecting other children will protect our own children. And, it’s what we do for neighbors.

Check out Shot@Life. Do something this week to help your neighbors in Nigeria, Laos, Bangladesh, and elsewhere.

By Trish Parnell

Image courtesy of Shot@Life


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