London!

9 07 2012

Are you going to London for the OlympicsI lived in Calgary when the Games were held there. It’s chaos and fun and nothing like you’d expect, if you’ve never been.

You’ll meet people and germs from scores of countries—about 11 million people, to be specific, and each one teeming with his or her own microbes. Olympics health director Brian McCloskey says they’re ready to go and will be on the lookout primarily for GI bugs “and infectious diseases such as measles.”

Want to bring home souvenirs that won’t make you sick? Use this CDC piece as a checklist on staying healthy in London during the Olympics:

Be Up-to-Date on Your Jabs

Some illnesses that are very rare in the United States, such as measles, may be common in other countries. Make sure that you and any children traveling with you have had all shots. Even if you had all routine vaccines as a child, ask your doctor if you need a tetanus/diphtheria/pertussis booster.

Watch Out for that Lorry!

In the United States, you’re taught to look left, look right, and look left again before you cross the road. In England, however, they drive on the left side of the road. That means you should always look right, look left, and look right again to avoid stepping into the path of traffic driving on the left.

Get Thee to an A&E

If you get hit by a lorry, don’t call 911, call 999, and don’t ask to be taken to the ER, ask for the A&E (Accident and Emergency). Only call 999 in the event of a serious illness or injury. For cuts and scrapes, muscle strains, or minor illnesses, visit a pharmacy or walk-in center (no appointment needed). To find a pharmacy or walk-in center, visit www.nhs.uk/London2012  or call 0845-4647.

Note that the health insurance that covers you in the United States probably won’t cover you while you’re overseas, so you may have to pay out-of-pocket for any care you receive in London. Consider purchasing travel health insurance that will reimburse you for any costs you incur.

Go on Holiday (But Not from Healthy Habits)

Have a great time in London, and make sure you take your healthy habits with you:

  • Always wear a seatbelt.
  • Wash hands frequently, or use hand sanitizer.
  • Cough and sneeze into a tissue or your sleeve (not your hand).
  • When outdoors during the day, wear sunscreen, stay hydrated, and seek shade if you get too hot.
  • When indoors or at large events, know where emergency exits are.
  • If you drink alcohol, do so in moderation.
  • Use latex condoms, if you have sex.

Speak Like a Native

Some terms, including health-related terms, differ between British English and American English. Be familiar with these to avoid confusion if you need medical care.

British English/American English

  • A&E (Accident and Emergency)/ER (Emergency Room), ED (Emergency Department)
  • Chemist/Pharmacist
  • Consultant/Attending Physician
  • Giddy/Dizzy, Unbalanced
  • Gip (“My back is giving me gip.”)/Aches, Pains (“My back hurts.”)
  • Holiday/Vacation
  • Jabs/Shots, Vaccinations
  • Lorry/Truck
  • Loo/Restroom
  • Paracetamol/Acetaminophen
  • Plaster, Elastoplast/Elastic Bandage, Band-Aid
  • Surgery/Doctor’s Office
  • Surgical Spirit/Rubbing Alcohol

More Information

Thanks to CDC for excellent info, as always.

Image courtesy of Flickr user kh1234567890


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