Time for a Tune-Up?

17 01 2011

The start of a fresh year is a clean slate, especially when it comes to our health. We’re making resolutions to exercise more, eat a little better, seek more relaxation. It can be a great opportunity to make those appointments that we’ve been putting off. January marks Cervical Health Month,  and it’s a nice reminder to get a check-up, ahem, down there.

PKIDs has several blogs and pods on HPV and cervical cancer if you want to find out what the big deal is, and it’s a pretty big deal.  Any of us can be at risk for STDs or cancer. Learning how to prevent infection is key to staying in control of our bodies.

The HPV vaccine gives us that control. In addition to preventing infection with many strains of HPV that can cause cervical cancer, it helps prevent STDs and anal cancer for both women and men .

There’s a lot of stuff to keep up with in our lives. At the start of a new year, it’s overwhelming!  Taking control of our own health by getting vaccinated to prevent disease is something we can easily do. Let’s make 2011 our healthiest year yet!





CDC’s Pre-teen Vaccine Campaign!

13 11 2009

CDC wants folks to know about these educational materials, so we’re doing the viral thing and passing this blurb along.  Hope you do the same:

Pre-teens Need Vaccination Too!

With school in full swing and winter just around the corner, now is a great time for parents of 11 and 12 year olds to get their kids vaccinated against serious diseases such as whooping cough, meningitis, influenza, and, for girls, cervical cancer.

CDC recommends that pre-teens should receive the following:
• Tdap vaccine – combined protection against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis
• Meningococcal  vaccine  – protection against meningitis and its complications
• Seasonal and H1N1 flu vaccines – protection against seasonal and H1N1 influenza viruses
• For girls, HPV vaccines to protect against the two types of human papillomavirus that cause up to 70% of cervical cancers. Each year, almost 4,000 women in the U.S. die of cervical cancer.

These recommendations are supported by the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Family Physicians, and the Society for Adolescent Medicine.

One of two available HPV vaccines also protects against warts in the genital area, and boys and men up through age 26 can get this vaccine.

CDC’s Pre-teen Vaccine Campaign has educational materials tailored for various audiences, including Caucasian, African-American, Hispanic, Asian American, and Native American parents, available in English, Spanish, Korean, and Vietnamese.

Visit the Pre-teen Vaccine Campaign gallery to download or order materials at NO COST.

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Gardasil Label Revised

12 06 2009

This week, the FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) revised Gardasil’s label.

Gardasil is a vaccine to prevent certain cancers and genital warts caused by some types of human papillomavirus (HPV).

The change is in the warnings and precautions section.  It indicates that those who’ve received the vaccine may faint and sometimes will have “tonic-clonic” (jerking) movements and seizure-like activity.

Some women and girls faint after they get this vaccine and when they do, they drop where they stand.  This has caused injuries.

When you get the vaccine, stay seated or lay down for several minutes in case you’re one of the few who faint upon receipt of the vaccine.

It’s not thought that an ingredient in this particular vaccine is causing fainting.  People faint with other meds, vaccines and under a host of other circumstances.

The FDA website has more on this label change.  Info about fainting following vaccination can be found in the MMWR and the revised Gardasil package insert can be found online as well.





Christine Baze’s Yellow Umbrella!

21 05 2009

Christine Baze talks about being a cervical cancer survivor and saving the “hooch!”

Christine Savin' the Hooch!

Christine Savin' the Hooch!

 

www.theyellowumbrella.org

Listen now!

Right-click here to download podcast (12mb/25min)