CDC’s Pre-teen Vaccine Campaign!

13 11 2009

CDC wants folks to know about these educational materials, so we’re doing the viral thing and passing this blurb along.  Hope you do the same:

Pre-teens Need Vaccination Too!

With school in full swing and winter just around the corner, now is a great time for parents of 11 and 12 year olds to get their kids vaccinated against serious diseases such as whooping cough, meningitis, influenza, and, for girls, cervical cancer.

CDC recommends that pre-teens should receive the following:
• Tdap vaccine – combined protection against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis
• Meningococcal  vaccine  – protection against meningitis and its complications
• Seasonal and H1N1 flu vaccines – protection against seasonal and H1N1 influenza viruses
• For girls, HPV vaccines to protect against the two types of human papillomavirus that cause up to 70% of cervical cancers. Each year, almost 4,000 women in the U.S. die of cervical cancer.

These recommendations are supported by the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Family Physicians, and the Society for Adolescent Medicine.

One of two available HPV vaccines also protects against warts in the genital area, and boys and men up through age 26 can get this vaccine.

CDC’s Pre-teen Vaccine Campaign has educational materials tailored for various audiences, including Caucasian, African-American, Hispanic, Asian American, and Native American parents, available in English, Spanish, Korean, and Vietnamese.

Visit the Pre-teen Vaccine Campaign gallery to download or order materials at NO COST.

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Whooping Cough Spreads Too Easily, So Vaccinate!

26 05 2009

silence the soundsWhooping cough sounds like something a pioneer child would catch.  Maybe from trudging through the dust behind her Conestoga wagon. 

No doubt there were plenty of cases back then, and not a darn thing they could do about it.  Now, there is something we can do, and if you’ve ever had pertussis (whooping cough), or watched a loved one go through it, you would get vaccinated as fast as the wheels of your car could take you to the nearest immunization clinic.

Pertussis is a highly contagious and potentially deadly bacterial infection that makes life absolutely miserable at any age, but is particularly dangerous for babies. 

The sounds of pertussis are like no other, marked by a “whoop” made when babies are gasping for breath after a severe coughing attack.

More than half of babies with pertussis are hospitalized.  Coughing can be so severe that it’s hard for babies to eat, drink or breathe and they can suffer from these complications:

• Babies may bleed behind the eyes and in the brain from coughing.
• The most common complication is bacterial pneumonia.  About 1 child in 10 with pertussis also gets pneumonia, and about 1 in every 50 will have convulsions.
• Brain damage occurs in 1 out of every 250 people who get pertussis.
• Pertussis causes about 10-15 deaths a year in the United States.

Pertussis spreads through droplets from the mouth and nose when an infected person coughs, sneezes or talks.

Because it’s most contagious during the first two weeks of infection when symptoms resemble a cold, pertussis just zips through a household.  A parent, grandparent or babysitter suffering from what seems like a cold can actually have pertussis and spread the disease to the baby. 

Babies don’t start the series of vaccines that include pertussis until they’re two months of age, and they don’t get the final dose until they’re at least four years of age, although they’re fairly protected by the time they’re one year old.  But until then and particular when they’re under six months of age, no one should be around them who’s not received the booster shot as an adolescent or adult.

Half of babies with pertussis are infected by their parents.  Most unvaccinated children living with someone who has pertussis will get the disease, and 90 percent of pertussis-associated deaths have been among babies less than a year old.

This is why it’s so important for parents and other family members to get the pertussis vaccine themselves to help “cocoon” babies and young children when they are most vulnerable to the dangers of pertussis.





Brie’s Story

9 10 2008

Baby Brie’s mom, Danielle, shares the story of Brie’s life and struggle with pertussis.

Listen now!

Right-click here to download podcast (7MB,14min)





Pertussis – A Family Story

8 05 2008

A mom shares the story of her family’s fight against pertussis.

Listen now!

Right-click here to download podcast (10MB,19min)





Nurse Mary Beth on Pertussis

15 10 2007

Nurse Mary Beth talks about pertussis – the disease and the vaccine.

www.pkids.org

Listen now!

Right-click here to download podcast (6MB, 12min)