Flu And Pregnant You

21 07 2016

Pregnant women are harder hit by flu than women of the same age who are not pregnant. Their symptoms are usually more severe, there are more hospitalizations, and they’re at higher risk of premature delivery or even death.

Although the infection doesn’t travel from the woman to her fetus, if the mom-to-be is infected, her infection may indirectly hurt the fetus. pixabaybelly

A premature delivery may mean the baby is too small, or underdeveloped. It can even mean death for the baby. If fever is present, mom’s infection can also lead to an assortment of abnormalities in the baby.

Why is this? Well, we can’t say for sure.

Part of a pregnant woman’s immune system is changed, or weakened, during pregnancy. This happens so that the woman’s body won’t attack the fetus as a foreign invader.

This altered immune state may allow a flu virus to attack, causing harm to the pregnant woman.

It’s also possible that part of the immune response is actually boosted during pregnancy, causing an increase in inflammation in the lungs when a pregnant woman is infected with a flu virus.

This in turn may be causing the increase in death and illness found in some flu-infected pregnant women.

The fact that pregnant women’s organs are squished may also increase the risk of pneumonia or other problems. Also, because of the increased blood volume, a pregnant woman’s lungs are a little “wetter” and less capable of resisting a severe infection.

Could be, may, might — that’s not what we want to hear. We want definite reasons so that we can use definite means to prevent all of this.

Unfortunately, it’s just not that simple.

If you’re pregnant, be extra cautious when it comes to flu. Call your provider as soon as you have symptoms — early treatment makes a big difference.

Symptoms may include:
•    Fever
•    Chills
•    Fatigue
•    Cough or sore throat
•    Runny or stuffy nose
•    Muscle or body aches, headaches
•    Vomiting and diarrhea (although this is more common in children)

CDC recommends that if you are pregnant and have any of these signs, you should call 911 right away:
•    Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
•    Pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen
•    Sudden dizziness
•    Confusion
•    Severe or persistent vomiting
•    High fever that is not responding to Tylenol® (or store brand equivalent)
•    Decreased or no movement of your baby

CDC recommends that individuals six months of age and older be immunized each year against flu.

Immunization and clean hands are the two best tools to prevent infection. Check with your healthcare provider to see about staying up-to-date on your immunizations.





Baby Armor

6 03 2014

And now, a timely reminder from CDC:PSA-superbaby

It’s easy for parents to think of vaccine-preventable diseases like measles or whooping cough as issues of the past, but we know that most of these diseases still persist around the world.

Just last year a higher than normal number of measles cases were reported in the U.S., including an outbreak of 58 cases in New York City that was the largest reported outbreak of measles in the U.S. since 1996.

Making sure children get all of their vaccines is the most important thing parents can do to protect them from 14 serious childhood diseases before their second birthday. And CDC has created a series of print PSAs encouraging just that (including an adorable  super baby version).

CDC also has immunization schedules available for all ages and a handy scheduling tool that allows you to enter your child’s birth date and print out a custom copy of his or her personal immunization schedule.

As winter begins to fade and a new spring season starts creeping up, don’t forget to schedule your pediatrician’s visits and discuss vaccinations with your doctor. Let’s give our little super heroes the best protection we can.





Brady’s Life

16 04 2012

Kathryn shares the story of her son Brady’s life, and his ferocious battle with pertussis.

Listen now!

Right-click here to download podcast (14 mins/7mb)





Preventing Baby Strep

10 02 2011

Group B strep (GBS aka Baby Strep)  is the main cause of meningitis and sepsis in newborns.  If left untreated, this bacterial infection can cause serious harm, but with the proper course of treatment, only five percent of newborns exposed to the bacteria will develop GBS disease.

One out of four pregnant women carries GBS bacteria in their vagina or rectum, although some pregnant women remain free of symptoms (vaginal burning or irritation, unusual vaginal discharge, or bladder infections), making infection a silent risk for newborns.

Symptoms of a baby infected with GBS include red or tender skin, discolored skin due to lack of oxygen, and difficulty breathing. Group B strep in babies can cause sepsis, pneumonia, meningitis and other serious illnesses.

Coupled with the potential impacts of GBS infection on pregnant women (preterm labor and early onset of water breaking), the lack of symptoms led to the U.S. and Canada specifying screening for GBS as the proper standard of care for women who are 35 to 37 weeks pregnant.

The CDC suggests the following for the prevention of GBS:

  • Testing of all preterm deliveries
  • Closer monitoring and treatment for pregnant women who are allergic to penicillin
  • Following the recommended testing guidelines at 35 to 37 weeks pregnant
  • Testing of pregnant patients who report bladder infections, unusual vaginal discharge, or vaginal irritation and burning.

Pregnant patients and their families should be aware of these recommendations and check with their doctor to ensure compliance.