Why Get The HPV Vaccine?

22 01 2013

HPV is short for human papillomavirus. About 20 million people in the United States, most in their teens and early 20s, are infected with HPV.

Not only does HPV cause almost all cervical cancers in women, it’s also responsible for other types of cancer.  HPV causes mouth and throat cancer, as well as anal cancer in both women and men.

HPV can cause cancers of the vulva and vagina in women, and cancer of the penis in men. In the United States each year, there are about 18,000 women and 7,000 men affected by HPV-related cancers.

Most of the HPV infections that cause these cancers could be prevented with vaccination.

HPV-related cancers can be devastating, as Jacquelyn, a cancer survivor and mother of two preschoolers, attests.

Soon after her second child was born, Jacquelyn was diagnosed with cervical cancer and needed a total hysterectomy.  “My husband and I had been together for 15 years, and we were planning to have more children—that isn’t going to happen now,” says Jacquelyn.

Although they caught Jacquelyn’s cervical cancer early, she still has medical appointments that take time away from her family, friends and work. “Every time the doctor calls, I hold my breath until I get the results. Cancer is always in the back of my mind.”

HPV vaccines offer the greatest health benefits to individuals who receive all three doses before having any type of sexual activity. That’s why HPV vaccination is recommended for preteen girls and boys at age 11 or 12 years.

The connection between vaccinating kids now to protect them from cancer later isn’t lost on Jacquelyn.  “I will protect my son and daughter by getting them the HPV vaccine as soon as they each turn 11.  I tell everyone to get their children the HPV vaccine series to protect them from these kinds of cancers.”

HPV vaccines are given in a series of 3 shots over 6 months.  It is very important to complete all 3 shots to get the best protection. More than 46 million doses of HPV vaccine have been given out, and vaccine studies continue to show that HPV vaccines are safe.

If your son or daughter hasn’t started or finished the HPV vaccine series yet—it’s not too late! Now is a good time to ask their doctor or nurse about vaccines for your preteens and teens. Visit www.cdc.gov/hpv  to learn more about HPV and HPV vaccines.

By the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention





Time for a Tune-Up?

17 01 2011

The start of a fresh year is a clean slate, especially when it comes to our health. We’re making resolutions to exercise more, eat a little better, seek more relaxation. It can be a great opportunity to make those appointments that we’ve been putting off. January marks Cervical Health Month,  and it’s a nice reminder to get a check-up, ahem, down there.

PKIDs has several blogs and pods on HPV and cervical cancer if you want to find out what the big deal is, and it’s a pretty big deal.  Any of us can be at risk for STDs or cancer. Learning how to prevent infection is key to staying in control of our bodies.

The HPV vaccine gives us that control. In addition to preventing infection with many strains of HPV that can cause cervical cancer, it helps prevent STDs and anal cancer for both women and men .

There’s a lot of stuff to keep up with in our lives. At the start of a new year, it’s overwhelming!  Taking control of our own health by getting vaccinated to prevent disease is something we can easily do. Let’s make 2011 our healthiest year yet!





Christine Baze’s Yellow Umbrella!

21 05 2009

Christine Baze talks about being a cervical cancer survivor and saving the “hooch!”

Christine Savin' the Hooch!

Christine Savin' the Hooch!

 

www.theyellowumbrella.org

Listen now!

Right-click here to download podcast (12mb/25min)





Allison Hicks and Cervical Cancer

10 04 2009

Allison Hicks is a doula and a cervical cancer survivor.  She talks about her life as both and shares one of her passions – the Hicks Foundation.

Listen now!

Right-click here to download podcast (13mb, 26min)