Sports and Infectious Diseases – Part 3 of 3

17 04 2013

Guidelines for Before, During and After Each Sports Event

The NCAA and NATA and other sports organizations carefully spell out the standards athletic organizers, including coaches, teachers and others, should follow before, during and after an 558354119_c856022b30athletic event.

Before the Event Begins

As part of the “pre-game” education program, NATA encourages trainers to:

  • Educate athletes about bloodborne pathogens.
  • Discuss the ethical and social issues related to bloodborne pathogens.
  • Review the importance of prevention programs, including standard precautions and immunizations.
  • Educate athletes about the signs and symptoms of hepatitis B [and hepatitis C] and HIV.

Make sure the athletes know the rules concerning standard precautions, including reporting all wounds immediately if and when they occur.  This is part of the coach or trainer’s critical pre-game education.

Before the opening whistle, cover all wounds, abrasions, cuts or weeping wounds that may serve as a source of bleeding or as a port of entry for bloodborne pathogens.  Remember, protection is a two-way street.  No one wants germs entering or exiting these wounds or abrasions. The “cover” or bandages should be able to withstand the demands of competition.

Wear protective equipment over high-risk areas where bruising commonly occurs, such as elbows or hands.

Make sure the necessary equipment and supplies needed to comply with standard precautions are available, including latex [or other non-permeable] gloves, biohazard containers, disinfectants, bleach solutions, antiseptics, containers for soiled equipment and uniforms and sharps containers.

During the Event

Underscore the importance of early recognition and control of any cuts or bruises that bleed.  Coaches and athletes alike should be prepared for appropriate cleaning and covering procedures and changing of blood-saturated clothes.

Require all athletes to report all wounds immediately.  Players with active bleeding should be removed from the event as soon as practical.  Return to play should be determined by appropriate staff.

All personnel involved with sports should be trained in basic first aid and infection control, including standard precautions:

  • They should use sterile latex [or other non-permeable] gloves for direct contact with blood or body fluids containing blood.
  • Gloves should be changed after treating each individual participant.  After glove removal, hands should be washed.
  • Any surface or equipment contaminated with spilled blood should be cleaned with gloves on.  The spill should be contained in as small an area as possible.  After the blood is removed, the surface should be cleaned with a disinfectant or decontaminant.
  • Proper disposal procedures should be practiced to prevent injuries caused by needles, scalpels and other sharp devices.
  • Any equipment or uniforms soiled with blood should be laundered in accordance with hygienic methods.

Any life-saving equipment should be maintained in accordance with infection control guidelines.

After the Event

When the game is over, any wounds, cuts, and abrasions should be tended to.

Coaches and athletic personnel should constantly review the level of knowledge and implementation of standard precautions policies and recommend revisions and retraining where necessary.

Appropriate policy development with legal and administrative assistance of existing OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) and other legal guidelines and conference or school rules and regulations should be considered on an as needed basis.

Medical Records and Confidentiality

While many experts feel an athlete should not have to “disclose” an infection to a coach, trainer or teacher, some athletes may decide personally to share information about a bloodborne viral infection.

The security, record-keeping and confidentiality requirements and concerns that relate to athletes’ medical records generally apply equally to those portions of athletes’ medical records.

Because social stigma is sometimes attached to individuals infected with HIV or viral hepatitis, athletic officials should pay particular care to the security, record-keeping and confidentiality requirements that govern the medical records for which they have a professional obligation to see, use, keep, interpret, record, update or otherwise handle.

An Infected Trainer, Teacher or Coach

A coach, teacher or trainer infected with a bloodborne pathogen should practice his or her profession while taking into account all professionally, medically and legally relevant issues raised by the infection.

Depending on individual circumstances, the infected coach, trainer or official must take reasonable steps to avoid potential and identifiable risks to his or her own health and the health of his or her team.

More information may be found at PKIDs’ Infectious Disease Workshop

Image courtesy of PShanks





Babies, Kids, and H1N1

3 09 2009

Delivery/Post-Partum and H1N1 – what do I do?

Breastfeeding may help protect newborns against influenza, but mom’s good handwashing habits before and after breastfeeding are just as important. If you are on medication for flu, you can still breastfeed. Your provider may suggest that you wear a mask when near your baby. If you have symptoms, you can still breastfeed; the milk is not contagious. But stay away from your baby if you are feverish.

Mothers who are infected with H1N1 when they deliver do not necessarily have to be separated from their newborn. A mother on medication should be able to breastfeed; separating her from her infant would not be advantageous. A mother who is actively sick with symptoms will not be very capable of caring for an infant and will need help, which will also help minimize contact and transmission. All caregivers should be vaccinated, and should also get a Tdap vaccination (tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis).

Do I need to worry about outbreaks in schools?

Because of the H1N1 outbreaks in community settings (camps, e.g.) this summer, experts do expect schools to be breeding grounds for H1N1.

School closure is an option, but is not expected to be necessary. Students (or anyone) with flu symptoms should stay home.

Other Concerns

Getting the pneumococcal vaccine can help reduce your risk of developing pneumonia as a complication of influenza infection.

For mothers infected with H1N1, masks are recommended in certain circumstances. Talk with your provider if you’re concerned. You should not need to wear a mask or gloves at home.

Do NOT attend a “flu party.” You should NOT purposefully infect yourself, or your children, with H1N1.

Recommendations

  • Fever and respiratory symptoms need to be taken seriously. Call your provider if you have any symptoms or concerns. Ask them for specific instructions; for example, they may want you to put on a mask before entering their office to help prevent infecting pregnant women.
  • Get vaccinated for both seasonal and H1N1 flu viruses. The seasonal vaccine will not protect you against H1N1.
  • Wash your hands often.
  • Maintaining good nutrition and getting plenty of rest will also help prevent illness.
  • Continue to receive prenatal care from your provider.
  • Everyone who is sick should stay home.

To get vaccinated, talk with your provider. OB/GYNs are supposed to receive vaccine to have on hand, in addition to clinics, pharmacies, and other typical venues for flu vaccine administration. If you have any concerns, about anything, at any time, talk with your provider – that’s what they’re there for!

To explore this issue further, visit:

Check with your provider to see if immunization is right for you and your family.

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