NOVA: Vaccines – Calling The Shots

28 08 2014

Premieres Wednesday, September 10, 2014 at 9PM/8c on PBS!

 

Press release from NOVA about this fascinating documentary:

Measles. Mumps. Whooping cough. Diseases that were largely eradicated in the United States a generation ago are returning.

Across America and around the globe, children are getting sick and dying from preventable diseases—in part, because some parents are choosing to skip their children’s shots. How and why do vaccines work? What are the biggest concerns and misconceptions, and what are the risks to the child and society when people decide to forego immunization? The award-winning science series NOVA helps viewers find the answers they need.

Misinformation about vaccines can spread quickly, creating confusion about the relative risks of vaccinating vs. not vaccinating. VACCINES–CALLING THE SHOTS is an important new film that encourages parents to ask questions and use the best available evidence to make decisions about how to protect their children.

This documentary travels the globe to provide the latest evidence and answers.  Featuring scientists, pediatricians, psychologists, anthropologists, and parents wrestling with vaccine-related questions, the hour-long film explores the history and science behind vaccinations, tracks outbreaks, and sheds light on the risks of opting out.  The film, produced for NOVA by Tangled Bank Studios in association with Genepool Productions, premieres Wednesday, September 10 at 9PM/8c on PBS (check local listings).

“Immunization plays a crucial role in our public health, yet there is a tremendous amount of apprehension and confusion around the topic,” said Paula S. Apsell, Senior Executive Producer for NOVA. “In VACCINES—CALLING THE SHOTS, NOVA dispels the myths and examines the latest science, engaging parents and viewers in a conversation with real answers about the best way to protect their families.”

“With the return of measles, whooping cough and other highly infectious diseases, we saw an opportunity to team up with NOVA to provide clarity for viewers about vaccination and what’s really at stake here for all of us,” said Michael Rosenfeld, Executive Producer for Tangled Bank Studios.

The vast majority of Americans—more than 90 percent—vaccinate their children, and most do it on the recommended schedule. Yet many people have questions about the safety of vaccines, and at least 10 percent of parents choose to delay or skip their children’s shots. The film illustrates how vaccines not only protect individuals, but also safeguard entire communities. The higher the overall vaccination rate is, the more protection for everyone.  For highly infectious diseases like measles, 95% of the community must be vaccinated to shield the larger population, a concept known as “herd immunity.” If the rate drops below that 95% threshold, even by just a few percentage points, this layer of protection can collapse, sometimes leading to the kinds of outbreaks reported in recent news headlines. Measles was declared eliminated in the U.S. in 2000; however, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report 566 confirmed cases in 2014, as of July 11. In 2012, there were nearly 50,000 cases of pertussis, also known as whooping cough, and 20 deaths, in the U.S.

Highlighting real cases and placing them in historical context, VACCINES—CALLING THE SHOTS demonstrates just how fast diseases can spread—and how many people can fall sick—when a community’s immunity barrier breaks down. The film chronicles a 2013 measles outbreak in Brooklyn, New York, in which 58 people fell ill, including two pregnant women. Dr. Paul Offit, a pediatrician and infectious disease expert at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, offers the physician’s perspective on the vulnerable immune systems of young children, the history of vaccines, and how diseases re-emerge when immunization rates decrease.

Some parents—including a number of new mothers interviewed in San Francisco—are concerned about the risk of adverse reactions from vaccination. The film acknowledges that there are very rare risks, but Dr. Brian Zikmund-Fisher, a psychologist and risk specialist at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, puts those risks in perspective: You’d need about ten football stadiums, each with 100,000 people, to find a single serious allergic reaction to a vaccine.

NOVA viewers meet Alison Singer, President of the Autism Science Foundation, and her daughter Jodie, who has autism. Singer cites the overwhelming scientific evidence refuting a link between vaccines and autism and discusses the lingering effects of a long-discredited study on public perception. The film further explores autism with new science from Dr. Dan Geschwind that reveals its genetic causes. His team and others have pinpointed mutations that affect the wiring of the developing brain—compelling evidence that autism begins in the womb.

VACCINES—CALLING THE SHOTS also follows Dr. Amy Middleman, Adolescent Medicine Specialist at the University of Oklahoma’s Health Sciences Center as she consults with patients and their parents on the safety and effectiveness of the controversial HPV vaccine, which protects against the cancer-causing human papillomavirus.

We’ll be watching on 10 September!





Travel in Good Health – Part 1 of 3

24 07 2014

[Editor’s note: We posted this a few years ago, but find the info timely, so what the heck, we’re running it again! Parts 2 and 3 run 25 and 26 July.]

Traveling with children, no matter their age, can be a joyful, tiring, exciting, and exhausting endeavor. Traveling with children who get sick on the trip is just plain exhausting and, sometimes, exciting in a way that we don’t want to experience.

Although dealing with illness in the midst of a family trip isn’t ideal, you can take steps to prevent illness before traveling and equip yourself with supplies to make the treatment of illness easier and more comforting.

Prevention is key, and no one does that better than the CDC. This article captures some tips for traveling families from CDC’s website, and a few other places.

If anyone in your travel group has an existing condition that may affect his or her health, it’s important to discuss travel health safety with a healthcare provider.

If you’re traveling outside the United States and you love detail, download a copy of CDC’s Yellow Book . It’s written for healthcare providers, but many people find it useful. Wherever you’re traveling, these suggestions may help you and yours avoid infectious diseases on the road.

There are steps you can take prior to departure that will protect you and your kids, and many things you can do while traveling. First, the pre-departure list:

Time Zones and Rest

If you’re changing time zones, spend a few days just before travel adjusting your sleep/wake periods to match the destination’s time zones. When you arrive, get out during the sunny periods so that you body realizes it’s time to be awake. Good sleep is critical to good health. Make sure everyone gets lots of rest a few days before and then during the trip.

Vaccinations

You and your kids should be up-to-date on currently recommended vaccines in the U.S.

If you’re traveling outside the United States, you need to check the destination country for recommended vaccines for you and your children, and if you have special health concerns, you need to determine which vaccines to get and which you should not have. Not all vaccines recommended for international travel are licensed for children.

Health Notices

If you’re traveling outside the U.S., read the CDC’s Health Notices first to get the latest updates on infectious diseases in various areas of the world. What you learn may affect your travel plans.

First Aid Kits

Prepare a first aid kit for the trip or purchase one from a commercial vendor. This is a sample list, as not all destinations require the same things.

  • 1% hydrocortisone cream
  • Ace wrap
  • Acetaminophen, aspirin, ibuprofen, or other medication for pain or fever
  • Address and phone numbers of area hospitals or clinics
  • Adhesive bandages
  • Aloe gel for sunburns
  • Antacid
  • Anti-anxiety medication
  • Antibacterial hand wipes (including child-safe) or alcohol-based hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol
  • Antibacterial soap
  • Antibiotic for general use or travelers’ diarrhea (azithromycin, cefixime)
  • Antidiarrheal medication (e.g., bismuth subsalicylate, loperamide)
  • Antifungal and antibacterial ointments or creams
  • Antihistamine (such as Benadryl)
  • Antimalarial medications, if applicable
  • Anti-motion sickness medication
  • Commercial suture/syringe kits (to be used by local health-care provider with a letter from your prescribing physician on letterhead stationery)
  • Cotton-tipped applicators (such as Q-tips)
  • Cough suppressant/expectorant
  • Decongestant, alone or in combination with antihistamine
  • Diaper rash ointment
  • Digital thermometer
  • Epinephrine auto-injector (e.g., EpiPen), especially if anyone has a history of severe allergic reaction. Also available in smaller-dose package for children.
  • First aid quick reference card
  • Gauze
  • Ground sheet (water- and insect-proof)
  • High-altitude preventive medication
  • Insect repellent containing DEET (up to 50%)
  • Latex condoms
  • Laxative (mild)
  • Lice treatment (topical)
  • Lubricating eye drops
  • Malaria prophylaxis and standby treatment, as required by itinerary
  • Medications that the child has used in the past year
  • Moleskin for blisters
  • Mosquito netting, if applicable
  • Oral rehydration solution (ORS) packets
  • Personal prescription medications in their original containers (carry copies of all prescriptions, including the generic names for medications, and a note from the prescribing physician on letterhead stationery for controlled substances and injectable medications)
  • Safe water
  • Scabies topical ointment
  • Sedative (mild) or other sleep aid
  • Snacks
  • Sunscreen (preferably SPF 15 or greater)
  • Throat lozenges
  • Tweezers
  • Water purification tablets

Discuss with your family’s pediatrician any special needs your children might have that require you to prepare beyond this basic list. Also, your pediatrician may be able to give you sample sizes of antibiotics and other meds that may be useful for your kit.

Health Insurance

Before traveling, check your health insurance policy to see what it pays for. It will probable reimburse you for most of the cost of emergency medical care abroad, excluding any deductible or co-payment. For non-emergency care overseas, you may be covered, but check with your health plan about this before you leave home. Failure to get authorization may mean denial of reimbursement.

Travel Regulations

Check travel regulations and carry what you can onboard the plane, particularly prescription medication. Put the rest in your checked baggage. Put your first aid kit in a fanny pack or backpack that you take with you everywhere you go. There’s no sense bringing the kit if you don’t have it when you need it.

Now that you’ve done your pre-departure prep, stay tuned for Part 2 for some tips on problems you may encounter on the road.

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Our Children Are Worth Every Penny

4 04 2014

A life-changing event—one involving our children—will make any parent regret what they could have, or should have, done. I have firsthand experience of this.

I held my daughter Abigale in my arms while she died of one of our world’s biggest vaccine-preventable killers of children, pneumococcal disease.

Abigale was just shy of her 6th birthday.

My name is Shannon Duffy Peterson. I’m a parent of four children, a business owner, and, through PKIDs, an advocate for immunization.

My younger children are at home in Sleepy Eye, MN, and my oldest, Abigale, is up in heaven with her grandparents.

Abigale

Abigale

In 2001, my five-year-old daughter became a statistic when she died of a vaccine-preventable disease. Abigale became infected with pneumococcal bacteria during the 2001 influenza vaccine shortage. She was not vaccinated for either disease.

When our children were born, my husband, DuWayne, and I were adamant about vaccinating our children. We wanted our children to be protected against everything. We wanted healthy children.

At that time, we had a pediatrician who did not push vaccinations and did not recommend the most recent vaccines available. Consequently, my children did not have their chickenpox, flu, or pneumococcal vaccinations.

February 18, 2001, began as a normal Sunday; we took the children to Sunday school, went to church together, played throughout the day, danced with them to music, and then relaxed with them before bedtime by playing a board game.

Abigale said she suddenly wasn’t feeling well and had a headache. We had her lie down, took her temperature, it was 101.5, and gave her some Motrin.

She started to vomit up the medicine. We thought she had the flu. We thought this was strange because she’d had the same illness and a sinus infection two weeks earlier, but she was in kindergarten and we knew of the many germs the kids pass around.

We became alarmed when a rash developed all over her body that we had never seen before, but we suspected it to be a high fever rash. I called the emergency room and was told it was a flu going around with high fever, vomiting, and diarrhea, and to just treat the fever alternately with Motrin and Tylenol and a tepid bath.

Abigale was tired and we put her to bed planning to check on her quite frequently but hoping she would sleep off the flu. Throughout the night we kept changing her bedding and bathing her to break the fever, even though she seemed pretty lethargic, and we ended up sleeping with her to comfort her.

We awoke later to her crying for “Mommy,” as she had fallen out of bed while attempting to make it to the potty. It was then, while cleaning her up, that my husband noticed the tremendous blotches on her skin and said, “This is not normal and we have to get her to the emergency room right away.”

We woke up our little boy, got them both in the truck, and drove as fast as we could the 21 miles to New Ulm. We called the hospital on the way to say we were coming and prayed for the best.

I sat in the back with the children, comforting Abigale. When she said to me, “Mommy I hurt so bad all over,” I assured her it was from the sickness and held her in my arms the best that I could while we were all buckled up. Those were the last words I would ever hear from my beautiful little girl. She died in my arms while we were driving.

When we arrived at the hospital they called a code blue and attempted for one hour to revive her. Her heart never started, and they were breathing for her.

She was pronounced dead at 7:20am Monday, February 19th. Our hearts broke that day as our son, Abigale’s little brother, witnessed all this and we had to tell him that his playmate, his bedtime companion, had died and there was nothing Mommy and Daddy or the doctors could do to save her.

Two hours after we arrived home from saying goodbye to our first born, our son started to experience some of the same symptoms as his sister, and I rushed him to the clinic. They got us in immediately and started running tests.

While we were waiting for results, Samuel, our son, started to vomit.

I couldn’t believe this was happening all over again and was holding him on the floor of the doctor’s office when our pediatrician came in with Abby’s preliminary autopsy results, stating that she’d had overwhelming sepsis caused by streptococcus pneumonia, congenital asplenia (absence of a spleen) and hemorrhagic adrenal glands. I thought I would lose both my children that day.

While my daughter’s death happened quite quickly and I wasn’t able to save her by rushing to the hospital, I was able to save my son by hospitalizing him directly after her death for two days, as he was extremely sick.

With hospitalization and medication he recovered enough to be released from the hospital in time to attend his sister’s funeral.

My world changed in those life-altering 3 days; I now understand the importance of vaccines and how children’s lives depend on them.

I am asking all parents to make sure all kids are kept healthy and to vaccinate children. If we do this, we will save lives. It is our responsibility, as parents and medical professionals, to protect our children, and to try to protect all children.

It is not ok, in my opinion, to reduce the number of pneumococcal conjugate doses children get based on cost, or on the fact that we have, thankfully, a full immunization schedule. We listened to our pediatrician, we didn’t vaccinate, and we lost our Abigale. We almost lost our son, Samuel.

I’m sure all of you follow the recommended vaccine schedule. If a primary dose of the pneumo vaccine is removed, it will save some dollars and mean one less vaccination for kids, but it will also mean more kids will die. More kids will be hospitalized. More kids will be in pain.

If you follow such a schedule and your child is hospitalized or if you should lose your child to this cost-saving measure, well, that would be unthinkable. It’s not an acceptable risk for your family, or mine, or anyone else’s.

Why would we ever choose to increase infection when we can decrease the number of cases through simple vaccination?

Thank you for allowing me to share my story.

 

 

by Shannon Duffy Peterson

 

[The ACIP is discussing whether or not to recommend removing a primary dose of pneumococcal vaccine for children. This is Shannon’s testimony in response to that discussion.]





Pneumo – It’s All About the Numbers

3 03 2014

DDWhen we are immunized, we usually have to get several shots, or doses, before we’re protected against a disease.

Nearly all vaccine-preventable diseases require more than one dose of vaccine to provide us with a strong immune response. It’s not fun, but it’s better than fighting all those infections.

Last summer, an article in Pediatrics described a study which looked at the cost-effectiveness of removing a primary dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13).

This vaccine helps to prevent pneumococcal infections, which can mean anything from an ear infection to pneumonia to meningitis. It can be a dangerous and deadly infection.

Right now, this vaccine is a four-dose series. The first three doses are primary doses, and the fourth dose is a booster.

A primary dose “primes” the immune system, allowing our bodies to develop stronger immunity with each primary dose we receive. The booster dose is the last shove to get us over the top, helping our bodies to develop long-lasting immunity against a particular disease.

The study in Pediatrics was the topic of conversation at PKIDs for several weeks, and, while we were surprised that removing a dose was up for consideration (and you’ll see why in a minute), we thought it was probably more of an intellectual exercise than a course of action that our public health leaders in the US would take.

After all, our tradition in the US is to use all of the tools we have to protect our citizens and prevent infections.

Come to find out, this is more than an exercise in “what if.”

In February, I attended the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) meeting in Atlanta.

(As noted on their website, the ACIP “is a group of medical and public health experts that develops recommendations on how to use vaccines to control diseases in the United States. The recommendations stand as public health advice that will lead to a reduction in the incidence of vaccine preventable diseases and an increase in the safe use of vaccines and related biological products.”)

Based on that meeting, it sounds like they’re looking at removing a primary dose as a real option.

This may give us an opportunity to save money—$400 to $500 million—but it’s not a risk-free deal. In order to save that money, we have to be willing to see harm come to a lot of people.

This flies in the face of what we, as health advocates, say every day to the folks we meet, which is: Get immunized! Use the safe and effective prevention tools available to protect yourself and your family from unnecessary infections.

It’s easier to make this kind of money-saving decision if the conversation is all about the numbers: the dollar amount saved, the numbers of increased cases of disease, the numbers of hospitalizations and deaths.

Numbers are easy to talk about because they’re not personal.

But this decision to remove a primary dose of vaccine is personal. The consequences will be felt by our people, our loved ones, our friends, and our neighbors. We can’t dehumanize this process by just talking about the numbers.

If the third primary dose is removed, an average of 2.5 more people will die each year. Who are those people? One could be my niece, Millie, who’s just learning to crawl. Another could be your grandson, who loves cheerios and bananas.

Forty-four more people will get invasive pneumococcal disease. My daughter could get meningitis, and your son could get a bloodstream infection.

Fifteen hundred more people will be hospitalized for pneumonia. When my oldest was a toddler, she was hospitalized for pneumonia. It’s a terrifying experience and one that I would not have anyone else go through, if possible.

An additional 10,000 of our friends and neighbors and loved ones will have to be treated for pneumonia as outpatients.

Twenty-three hundred more ear tubes will have to be inserted into the tiny ears of children that we know.

A staggering 261,000 more children will get earaches, fevers, and possibly ruptured eardrums.

All of this happens if we decide to save money and remove a primary dose of PCV13.

It’s all about the numbers. We just have to decide which numbers are more important to us as a nation—the dollar amounts or our people?

by Trish Parnell





Flu Then and Now

12 12 2013

The CDC came out with a lot of flu info today. Here’s a rundown on the highlights with a link to the rest at the end of the post:

CDC says that during last year’s flu season, 45 percent of the U.S. population aged 6 months and older was vaccinated against flu.

Influenza vaccination during 2012-2013 prevented 6.6 million illnesses, 3.2 million medical visits and 79,000 hospitalizations. Overall, this resulted in 17 percent fewer illnesses, medical visits, and hospitalizations than would have happened without flu vaccination.

The numbers are big, but the percentage is small. We need to increase the numbers of those vaccinated, and we need to come up with a more effective vaccine.

CDC estimates that during 2012-2013, there were 31.8 million flu-associated illnesses, 14.4 million medically attended illnesses, and 381,000 hospitalizations in the United States.

As for this year, CDC is recommending that those who have not yet been vaccinated do so. It takes about two weeks after vaccination for the body to develop immunity.

Most years, the flu season in the US peaks between January and March, which is reason enough to get immunized in December.

This year looks to be typical. Get vaccinated now and save yourself and your family the misery of infection.

The recommendation is that everyone six months of age and older get immunized against flu.

Visit the CDC Flu website for more info: http://www.cdc.gov/flu/





Meningitis Outbreaks This Holiday Season

25 11 2013

What’s going on with meningitis at Princeton and UC Santa Barbara?

Both universities are experiencing an outbreak of meningitis—specifically, serogroup B (that’s the genetic fingerprint of the particular strain of meningitis).

In the US, we don’t have an approved vaccine against this serogroup or strain, but we do have vaccines that fight other strains of meningitis, such as C and Y. Those vaccines are working great!

We’re seeing more serogroup B infection right now because there’s no vaccine available in the US to control transmission. And, we’re seeing an outbreak because that just happens sometimes, particularly when there’s no vaccine to prevent it.

As of 25 November, there have been seven cases identified at Princeton, with a probable eighth case not yet formally identified. Three cases have been identified so far at UC Santa Barbara.

Some of the cases have been serious, but to date there are no deaths. Dr. Amanda Cohn, a pediatrician and expert in meningitis with the CDC, talked about these outbreaks today in a teleconference.

She said that while health departments and healthcare providers should be aware of symptoms and think about meningitis should they see indications, it is safe for the college kids to come home for the holidays.

CDC is not expecting transmission in the home. It tends to occur with very close contact (“french” kissing, sharing a room and coughing all over a roommate). Generally, you might get either meningococcal meningitis or meningococcal septicemia from a meningococcal infection.

Symptoms of meningococcal meningitis as noted by CDC include:

  • Sudden onset of fever
  • Headache (severe)
  • Stiff neck (hurts to move it)

Other symptoms might include:

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Photophobia (increased sensitivity to light)
  • Altered mental status (confusion)

The symptoms of meningococcal meningitis can appear quickly or over several days. Typically they develop within 3-7 days after exposure. This infection can be serious with long-term consequences such as hearing loss or brain damage, and it is at times fatal.

Symptoms of meningococcal septicemia may include:

  • Fatigue
  • Vomiting
  • Cold hands and feet
  • Cold chills
  • Severe aches or pain in the muscles, joints, chest or abdomen (belly)
  • Rapid breathing
  • Diarrhea
  • In the later stages, a dark purple rash

These symptoms can come on in a matter of hours and the infection is very dangerous.

Prevention means washing your hands and covering your coughs and sneezes. Get up-to-date on your immunizations (no matter your age) and know that, if a healthcare provider suspects someone in the home may have an infection, those in close contact will receive antibiotics to prevent the spread of the disease. There are some manufacturers working on vaccines that include serogroup B for approval in the US, but they are not yet at the final stages of development on those vaccines.





I’m Immunized! (Pass it on!)

12 11 2013

At PKIDs, we have seen the awful reality of children affected by preventable disease: horrible illnesses, hospitalizations, chronic infections, and sometimes death. C

We share our stories with the hope that others will learn from them and get their families fully vaccinated to protect themselves and the ones they love.

In the same way that we are intimately familiar with the harm that comes from not vaccinating, we are also joyously aware of what happens when a family is fully vaccinated.

We want families to understand that getting vaccinated isn’t just about avoiding the horrors of disease. It’s also about experiencing the happiness of health.

Our I’m Immunized! campaign is a visual depiction of immunized people living happy, energetic lives.

We invite you, as immunization advocates, to share these images through your social media platforms, and to use them in your organizations’ educational outreach.

Immunization advocates at PKIDs share their families’ personal stories of illness and loss with the hope that those who hear the stories will be motivated to protect themselves and their loved ones through vaccination.

We humans are certainly motivated by empathy for others and a feeling of vulnerability for ourselves and those we love.

We are also motivated by positive messages that make us aspire to attain positive goals.

Both approaches may be effective, as noted by Angela Y. Lee and Jennifer L. Aaker in Journal of Personality and Social Psychology: “A positive frame that promotes something desirable is more effective than a negative frame that laments the absence of something desirable. At the same time, a negative frame that threatens the onset of something undesirable is more effective than a positive frame that promises the absence of something undesirable—a concept known as ‘regulatory fit’.”

RRAs parents, we at PKIDs share the realities of vaccine preventable infections with those who question the need for protection by immunization. We also propose to share the benefits of a vaccinated life.

Staying healthy is good. When you’re healthy, you can play and party and easily tackle life’s challenges. Vaccinating is a beneficial choice because it makes one’s life healthier and therefore happier. Adding that messaging through the I’m Immunized! campaign to our current communications mix is just what we all need to help spotlight the positive aspects of vaccination.

We encourage you to send us pictures (pkids@pkids.org) of family members of various ages who have been immunized. We’re looking for good, impactful photography. We will format them and add them to the growing library of images depicting the positive that comes through immunization.

Or, upload your pictures to your social media platform of choice (Google+, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, etc) and use the hashtag #I’mImmunized! or, #We’reImmunized! if there’s more than one of you in the photo.

We’d love to hear or see how you’re using these images to promote immunization. Share with us directly at pkids@pkids.org, or in the comment section below.

Thanks!