Universal Immunization Symbol

5 11 2013

immunize_rgb_fullcolorGood news! The universal immunization symbol is ready and available for use by all immunization advocates.

It is designed for all immunization organizations and advocates to display as a way to show solidarity in their awareness of and support for immunization.

The concept is that, just as a pink ribbon is associated with breast cancer, and a puzzle piece with autism, so this image is the recognized symbol of immunization. Organizations are encouraged to work together and use this symbol as a statement of broad support of immunization.

It is a reflection of all of our voices and is a solid addition to each organization’s individual image library. The symbol does not replace organizational or campaign logos, but is rather a symbol to be used when we wish to collectively present a united front in support of immunization.

The symbol’s use is limited only by our imaginations. It’s envisioned that the image will be used on anything from Web sites, brochures and other print materials, to T-shirts, pins, and social media sites.

In the spring of 2013, immunization coalitions around the country voiced a desire for a universal symbol. Putting thought into action, a small group representing the coalitions worked together to identify several potential designs.  These designs were put forward, and through a public vote, this symbol was chosen.

The umbrella, representing protection of the community, tells the story of the power of immunizations. The symbol, in several formats, is housed on Google Docs, and is available to all immunization advocates as a free download.

In addition to the logo in full color, black, or white, there is also a Style Guide and Read Me guide on how to download and use the symbol: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B07MTd0yDhmyY05hTFFFRElITTg&usp=sharing

For questions, please contact one of the following:

 

Joanne C. Sullivan, RN, BSN

Pennsylvania Immunization Coalition

joanne.sullivan@immunizepa.org

 

Lynn Bozof

National Meningitis Association

lynn.nma@gmail.com

 

Litjen (L.J) Tan, MS, PhD

Immunization Action Coalition

lj.tan@immunize.org

 

Trish Parnell

PKIDs

pkids@pkids.org

 

 





Stay Healthy This Winter!

30 09 2013

Stay Healthy This Winter

Click here for larger image!





CDC – Working 24/7

20 04 2013

Welcome to NIIW!

Every 20 seconds, a child dies from a disease that could be prevented with a safe and effective vaccine. Millions more children survive, but are left severely disabled. Vaccines have the power not only to save, but also transform lives by protecting against disease – giving children a chance to grow up healthy, go to school, and improve their lives.  Vaccination campaigns sometimes provide the only contact with health care services that children receive in their early years of life.

Immunization is one of the most successful and cost-effective health interventions—it currently averts an estimated 2 to 3 million deaths every year in all age groups from diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), and measles.

cdc blogImmunization is a global health priority at CDC focusing on polio eradication, reducing measles deaths, and strengthening immunization systems. CDC works closely with a wide variety of partners in more than 60 countries to vaccinate children and provide technical assistance to ministries of health to strengthen and expand countries’ abilities to create, carry out, and evaluate their national immunization programs.

Too few people realize that the health of Americans and the health of people around the world are inextricably linked. Viruses don’t respect borders, so they travel easily within countries and across continents. By helping to stop vaccine-preventable diseases (VPDs) globally, CDC is also helping to protect people in the United States against importations of VPDs from other countries.

For example, in 2011, there were 220 reported cases of measles in the United States—200 of the 220 cases were brought into the U.S. from other countries with measles outbreaks.

The most effective and least expensive way to protect Americans from diseases and other health threats that begin overseas is to stop them before they spread to our shores. CDC works 24/7 to protect the American people from disease both in the United States and overseas. CDC has dedicated and caring experts in over 60 countries. They detect and control outbreaks at their source, saving lives and reducing healthcare costs. In 2012, CDC responded to over 200 outbreaks around the world, preventing disease spread to the U.S.

CDC’s global health activities protect Americans at home and save lives abroad. They reduce the need for U.S. assistance and create goodwill and good relationships with global neighbors.

Thanks to the CDC for sharing this information.





Hep B Clinical Trial

16 01 2013

When babies are infected with hepatitis B, chances are they’ll stay infected for life. It becomes a chronic condition.

Some live long lives and their deaths are unrelated to their hep B infection.

Others develop cancer or their liver gives out. And then there are those who have minor symptoms, such as jaundice or fatigue.

You never know what or when or if something’s going to happen.

There’s no wonder drug for this disease. The available treatments are anemic at best, and few get favorable results.

My daughter, who was infected as an infant, has lived with hep B for 13 years. We’ve waited a long time for drugs that might work for her stage of the disease.

Hope has just peeked over the horizon.

NIH is running a clinical trial through a few centers in the US and Canada on children whose hep B infection is at a certain stage.

They’re using a combination of entecavir and pegylated interferon. They’re not looking for a cure, but rather hoping to slow it down. Even the best results wouldn’t remove the hep b virus from the cells. It’s integrated now, and there’s no work being done that’s close to getting it out of the cells it’s infected.

But, if the stars align and results are better than expected, it could be that those who respond to this treatment can relax, knowing hep B needn’t remain on their worry list.

That’s what we want. We all want our kids to live long, happy, healthy lives.

We flew to San Francisco yesterday for blood work and to sign forms. Lots of forms. Dr. Phil Rosenthal is running the trial and Shannon Fleck, the clinical research coordinator at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital, is assisting. I’ve known Phil for nearly 20 years and was delighted to see how optimistic he is about this drug combo.

This first step is to determine if my daughter is eligible for participation in the study. Her lab results have to match the criteria set for the trial.

If she is eligible, we fly back down within 30 days and her name goes into a computer, which then spits back out her placement. She’ll either be in the control group (no treatment) or the treatment group.

If she’s in the control group and the study is proving successful, she’ll be allowed compassionate use of the drugs, but that won’t be for two or three years.

That’s where we are—not even past the first hurdle.

I know people who’ve been infected with hep B in their adult years and have died from the disease. And I know people who’ve had cancer or liver transplants, or both—all because of this infection.

There are lots of ways to become infected. The easiest way to prevent infection is to get vaccinated. You, your siblings, your parents, your kids . . . ask your healthcare provider about it.

You can’t fix this with an aspirin.

By Hep B Mom





Flu Infographic

10 01 2013

Flu.gov has this infographic that answers questions we all have. Take it and pass it on!

flu_infographic_lrg





Whooping Cough – How Quickly it Spreads

10 12 2012

This Seattle mom shares the story of her infection, and consequently, that of her newborn son.





Why Vaccinate? I Never Get Sick!

5 11 2012

No matter your age, if you’re sitting in a moving vehicle you’re required to wear a seatbelt or to be in a size-appropriate car seat.

Most states require that anyone riding a bicycle or a motorcycle wear a helmet. And again, it doesn’t matter what age you are.

Kids going to public schools are required to be immunized against several diseases for school entry. How many immunizations they’re required to get depends on the state they live in, and the school they attend.

I suppose I could think up a few public health scenarios that would require adults to be immunized against a particular disease. But as a rule, unless our jobs require it, we adults are exempt from this particular requirement.

There are lots of protections in place for kids, as there should be. For instance, if I don’t feed my daughters, or provide adequate shelter for them, they’ll be taken away from me and placed in a foster home, where they’ll get the care they need. We need that oversight in place, so that no kids fall through the cracks. The heartbreak is that there are still kids falling through the cracks, but we do know that the oversights in place keep that number from being astronomical.

Most adults don’t need that kind of micromanagement when it comes to their health. But, they do need information. Before I became involved with PKIDs, I wasn’t even aware that there were vaccines for adults, other than the flu vaccine.

Now I know.

I don’t have time to get sick. I get vaccinated for me. I also wash my hands, try to get enough sleep, make myself eat green vegetables, and generally do whatever I need to do to keep myself healthy. But because I’ve met and talked with so many families affected by preventable diseases and I know how awful those infections can be, one of my motivations for getting vaccinated is so that I don’t accidentally infect someone else.

For example, it’s the infected adults and teens around babies who infect them with whooping cough, and it’s the infected birth moms who infect their newborns with hepatitis B. Babies infected with whooping cough can end up hospitalized, or worse. And babies infected with hepatitis B usually stay infected for life. This can lead to liver cancer or transplantation—if they’re lucky.

If you’re one of those people who never gets sick and figures you don’t need to be vaccinated—well, who knows, you might be right. But not getting sick is not the same as not being infected. You can and do pass on those germs to little babies who haven’t gotten all of their vaccinations yet, and others whose immune systems are not robust, for one reason or another.

So, you know where I’m going with this. Take just a few minutes the next time you’re at the pharmacy or your doctor’s office and ask what vaccinations you need. Do it for you, but also do it for the vulnerable in your life.

By Trish Parnell