Pneumo – It’s All About the Numbers

3 03 2014

DDWhen we are immunized, we usually have to get several shots, or doses, before we’re protected against a disease.

Nearly all vaccine-preventable diseases require more than one dose of vaccine to provide us with a strong immune response. It’s not fun, but it’s better than fighting all those infections.

Last summer, an article in Pediatrics described a study which looked at the cost-effectiveness of removing a primary dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13).

This vaccine helps to prevent pneumococcal infections, which can mean anything from an ear infection to pneumonia to meningitis. It can be a dangerous and deadly infection.

Right now, this vaccine is a four-dose series. The first three doses are primary doses, and the fourth dose is a booster.

A primary dose “primes” the immune system, allowing our bodies to develop stronger immunity with each primary dose we receive. The booster dose is the last shove to get us over the top, helping our bodies to develop long-lasting immunity against a particular disease.

The study in Pediatrics was the topic of conversation at PKIDs for several weeks, and, while we were surprised that removing a dose was up for consideration (and you’ll see why in a minute), we thought it was probably more of an intellectual exercise than a course of action that our public health leaders in the US would take.

After all, our tradition in the US is to use all of the tools we have to protect our citizens and prevent infections.

Come to find out, this is more than an exercise in “what if.”

In February, I attended the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) meeting in Atlanta.

(As noted on their website, the ACIP “is a group of medical and public health experts that develops recommendations on how to use vaccines to control diseases in the United States. The recommendations stand as public health advice that will lead to a reduction in the incidence of vaccine preventable diseases and an increase in the safe use of vaccines and related biological products.”)

Based on that meeting, it sounds like they’re looking at removing a primary dose as a real option.

This may give us an opportunity to save money—$400 to $500 million—but it’s not a risk-free deal. In order to save that money, we have to be willing to see harm come to a lot of people.

This flies in the face of what we, as health advocates, say every day to the folks we meet, which is: Get immunized! Use the safe and effective prevention tools available to protect yourself and your family from unnecessary infections.

It’s easier to make this kind of money-saving decision if the conversation is all about the numbers: the dollar amount saved, the numbers of increased cases of disease, the numbers of hospitalizations and deaths.

Numbers are easy to talk about because they’re not personal.

But this decision to remove a primary dose of vaccine is personal. The consequences will be felt by our people, our loved ones, our friends, and our neighbors. We can’t dehumanize this process by just talking about the numbers.

If the third primary dose is removed, an average of 2.5 more people will die each year. Who are those people? One could be my niece, Millie, who’s just learning to crawl. Another could be your grandson, who loves cheerios and bananas.

Forty-four more people will get invasive pneumococcal disease. My daughter could get meningitis, and your son could get a bloodstream infection.

Fifteen hundred more people will be hospitalized for pneumonia. When my oldest was a toddler, she was hospitalized for pneumonia. It’s a terrifying experience and one that I would not have anyone else go through, if possible.

An additional 10,000 of our friends and neighbors and loved ones will have to be treated for pneumonia as outpatients.

Twenty-three hundred more ear tubes will have to be inserted into the tiny ears of children that we know.

A staggering 261,000 more children will get earaches, fevers, and possibly ruptured eardrums.

All of this happens if we decide to save money and remove a primary dose of PCV13.

It’s all about the numbers. We just have to decide which numbers are more important to us as a nation—the dollar amounts or our people?

by Trish Parnell





Flu Then and Now

12 12 2013

The CDC came out with a lot of flu info today. Here’s a rundown on the highlights with a link to the rest at the end of the post:

CDC says that during last year’s flu season, 45 percent of the U.S. population aged 6 months and older was vaccinated against flu.

Influenza vaccination during 2012-2013 prevented 6.6 million illnesses, 3.2 million medical visits and 79,000 hospitalizations. Overall, this resulted in 17 percent fewer illnesses, medical visits, and hospitalizations than would have happened without flu vaccination.

The numbers are big, but the percentage is small. We need to increase the numbers of those vaccinated, and we need to come up with a more effective vaccine.

CDC estimates that during 2012-2013, there were 31.8 million flu-associated illnesses, 14.4 million medically attended illnesses, and 381,000 hospitalizations in the United States.

As for this year, CDC is recommending that those who have not yet been vaccinated do so. It takes about two weeks after vaccination for the body to develop immunity.

Most years, the flu season in the US peaks between January and March, which is reason enough to get immunized in December.

This year looks to be typical. Get vaccinated now and save yourself and your family the misery of infection.

The recommendation is that everyone six months of age and older get immunized against flu.

Visit the CDC Flu website for more info: http://www.cdc.gov/flu/





I’m Immunized! (Pass it on!)

12 11 2013

At PKIDs, we have seen the awful reality of children affected by preventable disease: horrible illnesses, hospitalizations, chronic infections, and sometimes death. C

We share our stories with the hope that others will learn from them and get their families fully vaccinated to protect themselves and the ones they love.

In the same way that we are intimately familiar with the harm that comes from not vaccinating, we are also joyously aware of what happens when a family is fully vaccinated.

We want families to understand that getting vaccinated isn’t just about avoiding the horrors of disease. It’s also about experiencing the happiness of health.

Our I’m Immunized! campaign is a visual depiction of immunized people living happy, energetic lives.

We invite you, as immunization advocates, to share these images through your social media platforms, and to use them in your organizations’ educational outreach.

Immunization advocates at PKIDs share their families’ personal stories of illness and loss with the hope that those who hear the stories will be motivated to protect themselves and their loved ones through vaccination.

We humans are certainly motivated by empathy for others and a feeling of vulnerability for ourselves and those we love.

We are also motivated by positive messages that make us aspire to attain positive goals.

Both approaches may be effective, as noted by Angela Y. Lee and Jennifer L. Aaker in Journal of Personality and Social Psychology: “A positive frame that promotes something desirable is more effective than a negative frame that laments the absence of something desirable. At the same time, a negative frame that threatens the onset of something undesirable is more effective than a positive frame that promises the absence of something undesirable—a concept known as ‘regulatory fit’.”

RRAs parents, we at PKIDs share the realities of vaccine preventable infections with those who question the need for protection by immunization. We also propose to share the benefits of a vaccinated life.

Staying healthy is good. When you’re healthy, you can play and party and easily tackle life’s challenges. Vaccinating is a beneficial choice because it makes one’s life healthier and therefore happier. Adding that messaging through the I’m Immunized! campaign to our current communications mix is just what we all need to help spotlight the positive aspects of vaccination.

We encourage you to send us pictures (pkids@pkids.org) of family members of various ages who have been immunized. We’re looking for good, impactful photography. We will format them and add them to the growing library of images depicting the positive that comes through immunization.

Or, upload your pictures to your social media platform of choice (Google+, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, etc) and use the hashtag #I’mImmunized! or, #We’reImmunized! if there’s more than one of you in the photo.

We’d love to hear or see how you’re using these images to promote immunization. Share with us directly at pkids@pkids.org, or in the comment section below.

Thanks!





Universal Immunization Symbol

5 11 2013

immunize_rgb_fullcolorGood news! The universal immunization symbol is ready and available for use by all immunization advocates.

It is designed for all immunization organizations and advocates to display as a way to show solidarity in their awareness of and support for immunization.

The concept is that, just as a pink ribbon is associated with breast cancer, and a puzzle piece with autism, so this image is the recognized symbol of immunization. Organizations are encouraged to work together and use this symbol as a statement of broad support of immunization.

It is a reflection of all of our voices and is a solid addition to each organization’s individual image library. The symbol does not replace organizational or campaign logos, but is rather a symbol to be used when we wish to collectively present a united front in support of immunization.

The symbol’s use is limited only by our imaginations. It’s envisioned that the image will be used on anything from Web sites, brochures and other print materials, to T-shirts, pins, and social media sites.

In the spring of 2013, immunization coalitions around the country voiced a desire for a universal symbol. Putting thought into action, a small group representing the coalitions worked together to identify several potential designs.  These designs were put forward, and through a public vote, this symbol was chosen.

The umbrella, representing protection of the community, tells the story of the power of immunizations. The symbol, in several formats, is housed on Google Docs, and is available to all immunization advocates as a free download.

In addition to the logo in full color, black, or white, there is also a Style Guide and Read Me guide on how to download and use the symbol: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B07MTd0yDhmyY05hTFFFRElITTg&usp=sharing

For questions, please contact one of the following:

 

Joanne C. Sullivan, RN, BSN

Pennsylvania Immunization Coalition

joanne.sullivan@immunizepa.org

 

Lynn Bozof

National Meningitis Association

lynn.nma@gmail.com

 

Litjen (L.J) Tan, MS, PhD

Immunization Action Coalition

lj.tan@immunize.org

 

Trish Parnell

PKIDs

pkids@pkids.org

 

 





Whooping Cough – How Quickly it Spreads

10 12 2012

This Seattle mom shares the story of her infection, and consequently, that of her newborn son.





Orange Nose Day is 5 October 2012!

20 08 2012

Orange Nose Day is just around the corner!

One day a year (October 5th), health educators don an orange nose and start talking. And here’s why . . .
 
Most days of the year, educators get out there and talk the talk, saying the same things repeatedly: wash your hands, get immunized, floss, eat fruits and veggies, and so on.
 
When we hear these messages often enough, they become white noise.
 
But, somebody puts on an orange nose and turns to us with the same messages, we start smiling and we’re all ears. That’s the spark that created Orange Nose Day.
 
If you have a health message to share, visit www.orangenoseday.org, get an orange nose on your photo, and use that photo on your social media sites come 5 October. Also, join the collaborative by sending in your organization’s logo and become a partner on the website!
 
The Orange Nose Day collaborative identifies five steps to good health and encourages you to add your own. The day isn’t about any particular message, but about sharing whatever health message you want your patients or public to hear.
 
There are lots of downloadables, including posters, web banners, and stickers, that are available free of charge on the site.
 
Hey, there are plenty of reasons to not kid around when we’re talking about health, but occasionally bringing a little levity to the message is a good thing.
 
Come, join the fun.





Mat Releases are Good!

11 06 2012

We’ve all written more press releases than we can count, and they do the job they’re supposed to do. But, here at PKIDs, we’re also quite fond of mat releases. They reach smaller publications by the hundreds and chances are, the words we write will get published without editing.

They’re a good way to get our news into communities across the country.

A mat release is a short feature story (approximately 400 words) written by you or someone in your organization. It’s distributed to small regional or local daily or weekly newspapers through a service such as NAPS or PR Newswire.

The story is usually run as-is by the editors, but is sometimes given a little editing. Small newspapers like mat releases because most don’t have the budgets to hire enough reporters to create all the features they need or would like, and a mat release is a ready-made story.

Mat releases are usually not too topical, as they take time to get into circulation and they’re picked up and used by editors for months after the release date.

If you include some sort of contest or other fun component in your mat release, it will increase the likelihood of its being picked up by editors. This isn’t always possible, but keep this approach in mind.

Artwork (usually a photo) will need to be included in any mat release you distribute. Editors love artwork and will sometimes use a story, or a bit of it, just to get artwork into their papers.

What A Mat Release Isn’t

Mat releases are not press releases. In a mat release, you share information in the format of a feature story that is of value or interest to a large group of people. You don’t “advertise” your services or products.

Cost

As a nonprofit, you should get a discount from the distributor. Even so, mat releases aren’t cheap—costing about $5,000. The upside is that they eventually reach lots of readers, so they’re considered a solid way to spend funds.

Writing

Distributors work with you on the writing of your mat release. They want you to be happy and will be diligent about editing and improving your work, if you need the help.

You have about 400 words to tell a story and share your important information.

Sample Mat Release (writtten for a program we did a few years ago, with notes on content)

Silence the Sounds of Pertussis

(The headline matters, so take your time to come up with something of interest.)

(NAPS)—New parents know to vaccinate their babies to protect against a number of childhood diseases. But what about vaccinating themselves to keep from spreading illnesses to their child? (This makes readers curious, so they want to read further.)

Most parents do not think of whooping cough, also known as pertussis, when they think of potential threats to their child’s health. However, this disease is making a strong comeback in the U.S., with a total of more than 25,000 reported cases in 2004 alone. (A strong fact that sets the expert tone of the piece and lets the reader know this is a serious problem.)

Luckily, there is a simple way to ease new parents’ minds: immunize mom and dad with the whooping cough booster. (They’ve heard the problem, and now they know there’s a solution. They want to find out more.)

Because of the growth of this disturbing trend, new mom and award-winning actress Keri Russell is teaming up with the nonprofit organization, Parents of Kids with Infectious Diseases (PKIDs), to launch a public awareness campaign: Silence the Sounds of Pertussis. The initiative aims to educate new parents about the dangers of this disease (especially to babies), and to encourage them to get the Tetanus, Diphtheria and Pertussis booster (called the Tdap vaccine) to keep their babies safe. (Here’s your solution to the problem: Talk about your program, clinic, or other topic you want people to know about.)

A recent study out of the University of North Carolina found that parents are the source of more than 50 percent of infant cases of whooping cough.

“When I found out that parents were infecting their children with this dangerous disease, I asked my doctor what I could do to prevent it from happening to my infant son,” Keri Russell said. “He recommended that my husband and I get the Tdap booster.” (Get some quotes in the piece from spokespersons/experts as this helps keep it personal.)

The Tdap is strongly recommended by the CDC for anyone who has close contact with a baby.

In adults, whooping cough symptoms often disguise themselves to look like a common cold, making the disease difficult to diagnose and easy to spread. (More facts to enhance the piece.)

Babies under 12 months of age are not only the most vulnerable to whooping cough, they are also the age group for which the infection is most life-threatening. Babies too young to have completed their primary vaccine series account for the majority of pertussis-related complications, hospitalizations, and deaths. In fact, more than 90 percent of pertussis-associated deaths were among babies less than six months old.

“The good news is that whooping cough is a problem that has a solution,” said Dr. Gary Freed, Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Michigan Medical School. “If every new and expectant parent receives the Tdap booster before or immediately after the birth of their baby, we could really reduce the risk of young babies getting whooping cough. If you provide care for a baby, talk to your doctor about how to protect him or her from pertussis.”  (The “ask” or what you want the reader to do.)

For more information on how you can help Silence the Sounds of Pertussis, visit the PKIDs website. (Give them contact information so they can find out more.)

Bottom Line

Are mat releases worth the cost?  Yes, if you can include that cost in a grant budget, it is worth it. Mat releases stay out for months and continue getting picked up long past the point you’d think they would. This release that we’re sharing in the blog ran for months and months. We were surprised (and happy) at the shelf life it had, and at the number of editors who ran it.

If you have any mat releases you’d like to share with others, put them in the comments section. We’d all benefit from seeing them!

Remember, these are not advertisements or advertorials. Keep them as features full of information people want, and editors will pick up the stories.

This article comes from PKIDs’ Communications Made Easy program.